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English and Theatre


Faculty


Chair

Advisor

Professors

  • Allred, Randal (1993) B.A. 1981, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1983, Brigham Young University; Ph.D. 1993 University of California at Los Angeles.
  • Han, Hsiao Ming (Sherman) (1980) B.A. 1973, Tamkang University; M.A. 1974, Central Missouri State University; Ph.D. 1980, Brigham Young University.
  • Williams, Ned B. (1981) B.A. 1972, University of Idaho; M.A. 1976, Brigham Young University; Ph.D. 1982, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Associate Professors

  • Christiansen, AnnaMarie (2003 ) B.A. 1992, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; M.A. 1996, University of Hawaii; D.A. 2003, Idaho State University.
  • Goodwill, Sanoma (1994) B.A. 1966, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1991, Morehead State University; Ph.D. 1999, The University of Louisville.
  • Hancock, Stephen (2003) B.A. 1996, Arizona State University; M.A. 1999, Brigham Young University; Ph.D. 2003, Purdue University.
  • Peterson, Keith S. (1987) B.A. 1985, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1987, Brigham Young University; Ph.D. 1995, Texas Christian University.
  • Plicka, Joseph (1987) B.A. 2002, Brigham Young University; M.A. 2006, Brigham Young University; Ph.D. 2011, Ohio University.
  • Patrick, Patricia (2007) B.A. 1983, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1989, Brigham Young University; Ph.D. 2007, University of North  Carolina, Chapel Hill.
  • Phung, Ban (2008) B.S. 1998, Arizona State University; M.A. 1999, Arizona University; Ph.D. 2006, Arizona State University.

Assistant Professor

  • Densley, Kristl (2016) B.A. 2004, Central Washing University; M.F.A 2012, Indiana University.

Special Instructors

  • Bradshaw, Emily (2007) B.A. 1999, Brigham Young University; M.A. 2002, Indiana University.
  • Naihe, Megan (2013) B.A. 2003, Brigham Young University-Hawaii.
  • Patrick, Scott (2012) B.A. 1988, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1991, Brigham Young University.
  • Plicka, Emily (2012) B.A. 2002, Brigham Young University; M.A. 2014, Ohio University.
  • Robertson, Stephanie (2009) B.A. 2006, Brigham Young University-Hawaii.
  • Sharp, Carolyn (2013) B.A. 2005, California State University Dominguez Hills; M.A. 2008, California State Polytechnic University.
  • Wolstein, Ashley (2014) B.A. 2006, Eastern Michigan University; M.Ed. 2012, University of Hawaii; M.A. 2012, Bowling Green State University.

Emeritus Faculty

  • Baker, Margaret P. (1981)
  • Elkington, Barbara Jo (1963)
  • Ferre, Craig (1980)
  • Marler, Michael G. (1978)
  • Marler, Myrna D. (1995)
  • Shumway, Eric B. (1966)
  • Walker, James R. (1978)
  • Ward, Gale L. (1975)

The Discipline


The English major provides a detailed knowledge of the English language and of literature written in English. English majors approach language and literature as a source of knowledge and aesthetic pleasure, a mode of encountering and evaluating diverse minds and attitudes, a vehicle for art and action, a means of historical understanding, and a source of spiritual insight. English majors use writing as their primary means of knowing, understanding, and evaluating their experience and their reading and of sharing their insight with others. In keeping with the long-standing ideals of a liberal arts education, the English Department aims to cultivate in its students those foundational skills in writing, awareness, and judgment upon which lives of wisdom, service, and an ever-increasing love for learning might be built.

Career Opportunities


English majors are prepared for any career that requires perceptive reading, orderly and clear thinking, intellectual maturity, and effective writing. Many career opportunities for English majors exist in teaching, professional writing and editing, law, business, advertising, communications, human resources, corporate training, or government service. English majors can certify to teach secondary-school English, or they can prepare for graduate study in English and college teaching. When combined with prerequisite courses in other departments, the English major provides excellent preparation for graduate work in law, business, library science, medicine, humanities, or religion. By selecting areas of concentration, some English majors prepare for careers in technical and professional communication, editing, creative writing, and related fields. By supplementing their English major with computer classes, some find work in information technology. The skills and knowledge acquired by an English major also provide good preparation for government service, especially when combined with the study of foreign languages, economics, political science, and history.

Program Outcomes


Upon completing a major in English, students will:

  1. Comprehend and reflect upon the value and richness of literary texts for the expansion of the intellect, for the testing of new knowledge, and for affirming the values of literature as literature.
  2. Learn about and engage in informed discourse and debate about selected works of literature, criticism, and theory.
  3. Find, analyze, evaluate, and assimilate new information related to the field of English studies.
  4. Compose, revise, critique, and refine persuasive critical papers in edited English.
  5. Work effectively with people from a wide variety of cultural backgrounds.
  6. Express themselves in a clear, concise, and convincing manner in public and professional settings.
  7. Understand, organize, integrate, and document successfully data from primary and secondary sources.
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Admission to All Programs

All undergraduate degree programs in the Department of English are open enrollment.
 

Major and Minor Requirements

The Department of English offers programs leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and English Education. Minor programs are offered in English, creative writing and communication studies. As part of its creative writing program the department publishes the literary magazine, the Kula Manu.

English major or minor is a program designed to provide an encounter with the humanizing forces of language and literature. As an important focus in the tradition of the liberal arts, the study of English should produce graduates more conscious of themselves, their nature, their society, their values, their tradition, and their language.


B.A. English (41 hours)

Core Requirements (8 hours)

  • ENGL 251 Fundamentals of Literature (3) (Pre-requisite for all English major courses except the "R" courses and ENGL 420)
  • ENGL 382 Shakespeare (3)
  • ENGL 490 Senior Seminar (2)

Additional Requirements (33 hours)

Electives - Choose Two (6 Hours)

  • ENGL 318R Advanced Creative Writing (3)
  • ENGL 351 Literary Criticism and Theory (3)
  • ENGL 358R Special Studies: Major Authors or Genres (Course Content Varies) (3)
  • ENGL 390R Special Topics in English (3)
  • ENGL 418R Writing for Publication (3)
  • ENGL 420 Literature for Young Adults (3)

World Literatures in English - Choose One (3 Hours)

  • ENGL 341 World Literatures in English (3)
  • ENGL 342 Pacific Literature (3)
  • ENGL 343 Asian Literature (3)
  • ENGL 345R Ethnic Literature (Course Content Varies) (3)

English Language - Choose One (3 Hours)

  • ENGL 321 English Grammars (3)
  • ENGL 421 History of the English Language (3)

English and American Literary Periods - Choose Seven (21 hours)

  • ENGL 361 American Literature from the Beginnings to Mid-nineteenth Century (3)
  • ENGL 362 American Literature from Mid-nineteenth Century to World War I (3)
  • ENGL 363 American Literature from 1914-1965 (3)
  • ENGL 364 American Literature from 1965-Present (3)
  • ENGL 371 English Literature to 1500: The Medieval Period (3)
  • ENGL 372 English Literature from 1500 to 1660: The Renaissance Period (3)
  • ENGL 373 English Literature from 1660 to 1780: The Restoration and Eighteenth Century (3)
  • ENGL 374 English Literature from 1780 to 1832: The Romantic Period (3)
  • ENGL 375 English Literature from 1832 to 1890: The Victorian Period (3)
  • ENGL 376 English Literature from 1890 to the Present (3)

Foreign Language Requirement

English majors are required to complete the Second Language Track for GE, which means successful completion of a 201-level foreign language course.

Note: English majors must earn the grade of C- or above for all classes chosen to fill requirements for the major.


B.A. English Education (74 Hours)
See Secondary Education » Learn more.

English Minor (15 hours)
  • ENGL 251 Fundamentals of Literature (3)

Choose Four (12 Hours)

  • ENGL 321 English Grammars (3)
  • ENGL 341 World Literatures in English (3)
  • ENGL 342 Pacific Literatures (3)
  • ENGL 343 Asian Literature (3)
  • ENGL 345R Ethnic Literature (3)
  • ENGL 351 Literary Criticism and Theory (3)
  • ENGL 358R Special Studies: Major Authors or Genres (3)
  • ENGL 361 American Literature from the Beginnings to Mid-nineteenth Century (3)
  • ENGL 362 American Literature from Mid-nineteenth Century to World War I(3)
  • ENGL 363 American Literature from 1914-1965 (3)
  • ENGL 364 American Literature from 1965-Present (3)
  • ENGL 371 English Literature to 1500: The Medieval Period (3)
  • ENGL 372 English Literature from 1500 to 1660: The Renaissance Period (3)
  • ENGL 373 English Literature from 1660 to 1780: The Restoration and Eighteenth Century (3)
  • ENGL 374 English Literature from 1780 to 1832: The Romantic Period (3)
  • ENGL 375 English Literature from 1832 to 1890: The Victorian Period (3)
  • ENGL 376 English Literature from 1890 to the Present (3)
  • ENGL 382 Shakespeare
  • ENGL 420 Literature for Young Adults (3)
  • ENGL 421 History of English Language (3)



Creative Writing Minor (15 hours)
  • ENGL 218R Introduction to Creative Writing (3)
  • ENGL 318R Advanced Creative Writing (3)
  • ENGL 319 Form and Craft of Literary Genres (3)
  • ENGL 392 Intro to Literary Editing and Publishing/Kula Manu (3)
  • ENGL 418R Writing for Publication (3)
NOTES:
  1. Students must earn the grade of C- or better for all classes taken in the program required of creative writing minors.

Professional Writing Minor (17 hours)
Required Courses (14 credits)
  • ENGL 316 Technical Writing (3)
  • ENGL 330 Writing for the Professions (3)
  • ENGL 331 Professional Career Writing (3)
  • ENGL 332 Writing for Social Media (3)
  • ENGL 491 Professional Writing Practicum (2)

Electives (3 credits)

  • COMM 201 Introduction to Strategic Communication (3)
  • COMM 211 Media Writing (3)
  • COMM 313 Cross-Platform Media Writing (3)
  • BUSM 320 Business Communication (3)
  • PMGT 350 Crisis Management (3)
  • POSC 354 Legal Research and Writing (3)

 NOTES:

  1. Students must earn the grade of C- or better for all classes taken in the program required of professional writing minors.

Theatre Minor (15 hours)
 
Required Courses (6 hours):
  • THEA 115 Introduction to Theatre (3)
  • THEA 123 Acting I (3)

Electives (9 hours):

  • THEA 141 Introduction to Theatre Tech I: Costume & Makeup Design (3)
  • THEA 142 Introduction to Theatre Tech II: Set, Lighting Design & Stage Movement (3)
  • THEA 221 Voice/Speech and Movement (3)
  • THEA 224 Acting II (3)
  • THEA 325 Playwriting (3)
  • THEA 361 Directing (3)
  • THEA 260R Theatre Workshop (1-3) and/or THEA 285R Rehearsal & Performance (1-4)