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International Cultural Studies and World Languages


https://ics.byuh.edu/

Tevita 'O. Ka'ili, Chair (tevita.kaili@byuh.edu)
MFB 214, (808) 675-3692

B.S. 1996, University of Utah; M.S.W. 1998, University of Washington; M.A. 2003, University of Washington. Ph.D. 2008, University of Washington.

Rowena Reid, Academic Advisor (reidr@byuh.edu)
ACR 141, (808) 675-3791

B.S. 1976, Brigham Young University-Hawaii; M.S. 1981, Oregon State University.

Faculty

Professor

  • Beus, Yifen Comparative Literature (2000) B.A. 1987, National Chengchi University; M.A. 1989, Brigham Young University; Ph.D. 2000, Indiana University.
  • Han, Hsiao Ming (Sherman) English (1980) B.A. 1973, Tamkang University; M.A. 1974, Central Missouri State University; Ph.D. 1980, Brigham Young University.
  • McArthur, Phillip H. Folkloristics (1995) B.A. 1987, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1989, Indiana University; Ph.D. 1995, Indiana University.
  • Richardson, Timothy W. Foreign Language Education (2001) B.A. 1975, Brigham Young University; M.P.A. 1977, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1987, Brigham Young University; Ph.D. 1998, The University of Texas at Austin.
  • Stout, Daniel (2013) B.A. 1979, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1985, University of Georgia; Ph.D. 1993, Rutgers University.

Associate Professors

  • Chen, Chiung Hwang Mass Communications (2001) B.A. 1985, World College of Journalism, Taipei; B.A. 1991, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; M.A. 1994, University of Iowa; Ph.D. 2000, University of Iowa.
  • Compton, D. Chad Organizational Communications (1992) B.A. 1979, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1982, Brigham Young University; Ph.D. 1987, Ohio University.
  • Ford, Chad International Law (2005) B.A. 1995, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; M.S. 2000, George Mason University; J.D. 2000, Georgetown University.  
  • Ka'ili, Tevita Sociocultural Anthropology (2005) B.S. 1993, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; B.S. 1996, University of Utah; M.S.W. 1998, University of Washington; M.A. 2003, University of Washington; Ph.D. 2008, University of Washington.

Assistant Professors

  • Beus, David Comparative Literature (2000) B.A. 1989, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1994, University of North Carolina; Ph.D. 2002, University of North Carolina.
  • Kajiyama, Katsuhiro Japanese (1969) B.A. 1967, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1969, Brigham Young University.

Special Instructors

  • Compton, Cynthia (1992) B.A. 1988, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1990, University of Missouri-Columbia; Ph.D. 2006, Brigham Young University.
  • McArthur, Elaine Spanish (1995) B.A. 1987, Brigham Young University; Post Graduate Certificate, Applied Linguistics, 1991, Indiana University.
  • Ram, Rosalind Meno (1994); B.A. 1989, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; M.L.S. 1993, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
  • Spring, Colleen Humanities (1993) B.A. 1982, Brigham Young University.
  • Tovey, Shirley French, (2004) B.A. 2001, Brigham Young University–Hawaii.
  • Walker, Rebekah Anthropology (2006) B.A. 1999, Brigham Young University–Hawaii.
  • Lee, Keri American Sign Language (2008) B.S.E. 2005, University of Arizona.
  • Bybee, Juanita French, B.A. 2004, Brigham Young University-Hawaii.
  • Payne, Zachary Spanish, B.A. University of Utah; M.A. University of Hawaii at Manoa; Ph.D 2015, Complutense University-Madrid.

Emeritus Faculty

  • Stanton, Max (1971-2006)
  • Ward, Kathy (1984-2006)

Admission to All Programs

All undergraduate degree programs in the Department of International Cultural Studies and World Languages are open enrollment.

 

The Discipline

The International Cultural Studies major represents an authentically interdisciplinary program that brings together the fields of cultural anthropology, communications and culture, and world humanities and cultures. In addition to stressing a variety of contemporary cultural systems, cultural theories, and effective cross cultural communication, the major will also include a range of historical considerations concerning cultural forms and global social forces. The major draws upon the expertise of faculty whose primary interests lie in the study of culture in an international environment.

 

Career Opportunities

The major will provide a rigorous pre-professional degree to prepare students for graduate school in law, business and public administration, diplomacy, public relations, development, as well as academic programs. As a terminal degree the program will prepare highly desirable and competent professional consultants, business and government administration, teachers, writers in fields and professions where cultural interaction and differences are significant.

 

Programs and Degrees

  • B.A. International Cultural Studies (with primary and secondary emphases in Cultural Anthropology, Communications and Culture, Comparative Humanities, and Intercultural Peacebuilding)
  • International Cultural Studies Minors (with emphases in Cultural Anthropology, Communications and Culture, or Comparative Humanities)
  • World Language Minors (Chinese, Japanese, Spanish)
  • Certification of Language Proficiency by Examination

 

Program Outcomes

Upon completing a major in International Cultural Studies, students will:
  • Possess an appropriate degree of cultural literacy in at least two world areas.
  • Manage cultural differences and develop problem-solving skills.
  • Think critically.
  • Articulate and sustain views through verbal and written discourse.
  • Be well prepared to enter graduate school or employment.

 Related Course Listings

ANTH | ART | CHIN | COMM | ENGL | HIST | ICS | JPN | MUSC | SPAN | HUM


Major and Minor Requirements

In addition to completing a set of cultural studies core requirements, each student will select one of four possible emphases: Cultural Anthropology, Communications and Culture, Comparative Humanities, or Intercultural Peacebuilding, as well as a secondary emphasis other than their primary choice. No grade lower than C- will be accepted in fulfilling major or minor requirements. A student will be dropped as an ICS major or minor after two unsuccessful attempts at obtaining at least a C- grade for a core or elective class.

B.A. International Cultural Studies (45 hours)
All ICS majors complete a set of core requirements in Area Studies, Theory and Seminar, a Language Study, and Senior Requirement.

Core Requirements

Area Studies—Choose one from the following geographical areas: (3 Hours)

  • ANTH 210 Contemporary Pacific (3)
  • ICS 261 Cultures of Oceania (3)
  • ICS 262 Cultures of Asia (3)
  • ICS 264 Cultures of Europe (3)
  • ICS 266 Cultures of Latin America (3)

Theory and Seminar (3 hours)

  • ICS 150 ICS Introductory Seminar (1)
  • ICS 151 Introduction to Cultural Studies Theory (2)

Language Study (3 hours)

All students must complete a course in a foreign language equivalent to the fourth college semester. International students who complete the EIL program fulfill this requirement.

Senior Requirement - Choose One (3 hours)

  • ICS 399R Internship (3)
  • ICS 490 Senior Seminar (3)
  • ICS 496R Research Associateship (3)

Select A Primary Emphasis Track:

Each ICS major selects a primary emphasis from Cultural Anthropology, Communication and Culture, Comparative Humanities, or Intercultural Peacebuilding
  1. Cultural Anthropology (21 hours)

    REQUIRED (12 hours)
    • ANTH 105 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 310 Anthropology Theory (3)
    • ANTH 322 Ethnographic Skills (3)
    • ANTH 447 Applied and Development Anthropology (3)
    CHOOSE THREE (9 hours)
    • ANTH 391 Narrative, Identity and Culture (3)
    • ANTH 445 Anthropology of Religion (3)
    • ANTH 450 Political and Economic Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 460 Anthropology of Globalization (3)
  2. Communications and Culture (21 hours)

    REQUIRED (9 hours)
    • COMM 110 Intercultural Communications (3)
    • COMM 200 Mass Communication and Society (3)
    • COMM 360 Communication Theory (3)
    CHOOSE FOUR (12 hours) - at least two must be 300-400 level.
    • COMM 201 Introduction to Strategic Communication (3)
    • COMM 211 Media Writing (3)
    • COMM 280 Gender, Race and Culture (3)
    • COMM 301 The Internet and Society (3)
    • COMM 326 Issues in Global Communications (3)
    • COMM 420 Media and Culture (3)
    • COMM 430 Media Law and Ethics (3)
  3. Comparative Humanities (21 hours)

    REQUIRED (15 hours)
    • HUM 101 Introduction to Humanities (3)
    • HUM 290 Introduction to Film (3)
    • ART/HUM 442 Philosophy of Art (3)
    • HUM 365R Special Studies in World Cinema (3)
    • HUM 440R Special Studies in Humanities (3)
    CHOOSE ONE-must be different cultural area from major's core (3 hours)
    • ICS 261 Cultures of Oceania (3)
    • ICS 262 Cultures of Asia (3)
    • ICS 264 Cultures of Europe (3)
    • ICS 266 Cultures of Latin America (3)
    CHOOSE ONE (3 hours)
    • MUSC 301 History of Popular Music (3)
    • MUSC 402 Seminar in Ethnomusicology (3)
    • ENGL 300-400 Any approved 300-400 literature course (3)
    • CHIN 441 Classical Chinese Literature (3)
    • SPAN 441 Survey of Spanish Literature (3)
    • SPAN 451 Survey of Latin-American Literature (3)
    • ANTH 391 Narrative, Identity and Culture (3)
  4. Intercultural Peacebuilding (21 hours)

    REQUIRED (9 hours)
    • IPB 121 Intercultural Peacebuilding (3)
    • IPB 352 Intercultural Conflict Dynamics (3)
    • IPB 454 Culture and Conflict Transformation (3)
    CHOOSE TWO-Culture and Conflict (6 hours)
    • ANTH 322 Ethnographic Skills (3)
    • ANTH 391 Narrative, Identity and Culture (3)
    • ANTH 445 Anthropology of Religion (3)
    • ANTH 447 Applied & Development Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 450 Political and Economic Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 460 Anthropology of Globalization (3)
    • IPB 390R Special Topics in Intercultural Peacebuilding (3)
    CHOOSE TWO (6 hours)
    • IPB 390R Special Topics in Intercultural Peacebuilding (3)
    • POSC 338 War and Peace (3)
    • POSC 362 International Political Economy & Development (3)
    • POSC 364 Conflict Bargaining and Management (3)
    • POSC 470 International Relations Theory (3)

Select A Secondary Emphasis Track:

Each ICS major selects a secondary emphasis different from his primary choice of Cultural Anthropology, Communications and Culture, Comparative Humanities, or Intercultural Peacebuilding.

Cultural Anthropology Secondary Track (21 hours)

REQUIRED (3 hours)
  • ANTH 105 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
CHOOSE THREE (9 hours)
  • ANTH 310 Anthropology Theory (3)
  • ANTH 322 Ethnographic Skills (3)
  • ANTH 391 Narrative, Identity and Culture (3)
  • ANTH 445 Anthropology of Religion (3)
  • ANTH 447 Applied & Development Anthropology (3)
  • ANTH 450 Political and Economic Anthropology (3)
  • ANTH 460 Anthropology of Globalization (3)

Communications & Culture Secondary Track (12 hours)

REQUIRED (3 hours)
  • COMM 200 Mass Communication and Society (3)
CHOOSE THREE (9 hours) - At least one must be 300-400 level
  • COMM 201 Introduction to Strategic Communication (3)
  • COMM 110 Intercultural Communication (3)
  • COMM 211 Media Writing (3)
  • COMM 280 Gender, Race and Culture (3)
  • COMM 301 The Internet and Society (3)
  • COMM 326 Issues in Global Communications (3)
  • COMM 360 Communication Theory (3)
  • COMM 420 Media and Culture (3)
  • COMM 430 Media Law and Ethics (3)

Comparative Humanities Secondary Track (12 hours)

REQUIRED (3 hours)
  • HUM 101 Introduction to Humanities (3)
CHOOSE ONE (3 hours)
  • ICS 261 Cultures of Oceania (3)
  • ICS 262 Cultures of Asia (3)
  • ICS 264 Cultures of Europe (3)
  • ICS 266 Cultures of Latin America (3)
CHOOSE TWO (6 hours)
  • HUM 290 Introduction to Film (3)
  • HUM 365R Special Studies in World Cinema (3)
  • HUM 440R Special Studies in Humanities (3)
  • ART/HUM 442 Philosophy of Art (3)

Intercultural Peacebuilding Secondary Track (12 hours)

REQUIRED (3 hours)
  • IPB 121 Intercultural Peacebuilding (3)
CHOOSE ONE (3 hours)
  • IPB 352 Intercultural Conflict Dynamics (3)
  • IPB 454 Culture and Conflict Transformation (3)
CHOOSE TWO (6 hours)
  • ANTH 322 Ethnographic Skills (3)
  • ANTH 391 Narrative, Identity and Culture (3)
  • ANTH 445 Anthropology of Religion (3)
  • ANTH 447 Applied & Development Anthropology (3)
  • ANTH 450 Political and Economic Anthropology (3)
  • ANTH 460 Anthropology of Globalization (3)
  • IPB 352 Intercultural Conflict Dynamics (3)
  • IPB 454 Culture and Conflict Transformation (3)
  • IPB 390R Special Topics in Intercultural Peacebuilding (3)
  • POSC 338 War and Peace (3)
  • POSC 362 International Political Economy & Development (3)
  • POSC 364 Conflict Bargaining and Management (3)
  • POSC 470 International Relations Theory (3)

International Cultural Studies Minor (18 hours)
 
The student will select an ICS emphasis from: Cultural Anthropology, Communications and Culture, or Comparative Humanities. Intercultural Peacebuilding may be pursued as a certificate through the David O. McKay Center for Intercultural Understanding.

Area Studies—Choose One: (3 Hours)

  • ANTH 210 Contemporary Pacific (3)
  • ICS 261 Cultures of Oceania (3)
  • ICS 262 Cultures of Asia (3)
  • ICS 264 Cultures of Europe (3)
  • ICS 266 Cultures of Latin America (3)

Theory and Seminar (3 Hours)

  • ICS 150 Introductory Seminar (1)
  • ICS 151 Introduction to Cultural Studies Theory (2)

Gateway Course-Select the intro course appropriate to the emphasis chosen (3)

  • ANTH 105 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
  • COMM 200 Mass Communication & Society (3)
  • HUM 101 Introduction to Humanities (3)

Electives (9 Hours)

Select three courses corresponding to the appropriate emphasis chosen, one must be selected from the 400 level.
  1. Cultural Anthropology

    • ANTH 310 Anthropology Theory (3)
    • ANTH 322 Ethnographic Skills (3)
    • ANTH 445 Anthropology of Religion (3)
    • ANTH 447 Applied and Development Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 450 Political and Economic Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 460 Anthropology of Globalization (3)
  2. Communications and Culture - at least one must be 300-400 level

    • COMM 201 Introduction to Strategic Communication (3)
    • COMM 110 Intercultural Communication (3)
    • COMM 280 Gender, Race and Culture (3)
    • COMM 301 The Internet and Society (3)
    • COMM 326 Issues in Global Communication (3)
    • COMM 360 Communication Theory (3)
    • COMM 420 Media and Culture (3)
    • COMM 430 Media Law and Ethics (3)
  3. Comparative Humanities

    • HUM 290 Introduction to Film (3)
    • HUM 365 Special Studies in World Cinema (3)
    • HUM 440R Special Studies in Humanities (3)
    • ART/HUM 442 Philosophy of Art (3)

World Language Minors (16 hours)
Note: No grade lower than C- is allowed within the minor.

Japanese Minor (16 hours)

  • JPN 201 Intermediate Japanese Conversation and Grammar (3)
  • JPN 301 Introduction to Japanese Literature (3)
  • JPN 311 Advanced Intensive Conversation (3)
  • JPN 321 Selected Reading and Grammar (3)
  • JPN 445 Special Studies in Japanese (3)

Chinese Minor (16 hours)

  • CHIN 201 Intermediate Chinese (3)
  • CHIN 301 Introduction to Chinese Literature (3)
  • CHIN 311 Advanced Chinese Conversation (3)
  • CHIN 441 Classic Chinese Literature (3)
  • CHIN 445R Special Studies in Chinese (3)

Spanish Minor (16 hours)

Track A (Students with International and/or Mission Experience)

Required Courses: (7 hours)

  • *SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish Conversation and Grammar (3)
  • SPAN 321 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3)

Elective Courses—Select Three (9 hours):

  • SPAN 393 Business Spanish (3)
  • SPAN 441 Survey of Spanish Literature (3)
  • SPAN 445R Special Studies in Spanish (1-6)
  • SPAN 451 Survey of Latin-American Literature (3)

Note: *May be completed through examination

Track B (Students without International and/or Mission Experience)

Required Courses (10 hours):

  • SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish Conversation and Grammar (3)
  • SPAN 301 Introduction to Literature (3)
  • SPAN 321 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3)

Elective Courses—Select Two (6 hours):

  • SPAN 393 Business Spanish (3)
  • SPAN 441 Survey of Spanish Literature (3)
  • SPAN 445R Special Studies in Spanish (1-6)
  • SPAN 451 Survey of Latin-American Literature (3)

Note: One elective must be either SPAN 441 or SPAN 451.

World Languages

The study of a world language is a unique educational experience. Since every human being uses language to communicate, and since language is a fundamental means of expression and inter-cultural communication, it is by means of this basic skill that students can participate in the life of another people and share their culture, their traditions, and their literature, oral or written. Through the study of a world language, students also come to learn their own language better.

The ICS and World Languages Department offers instruction in the following languages: American Sign Language, Chinese, French, Japanese, and Spanish.

Note: The Hawaiian language and other Pacific language courses are offered under the Hawaiian Studies program.

Certification of Language Proficiency by Examination

Students speaking a second or third-world language may receive credit by special examination for that language in which he or she has achieved the equivalent proficiency, either through missionary service, residence abroad, individual study, or courses for which no university credit was granted. Students meeting the latter criteria and wishing to receive proficiency credit for a second language to fulfill the GE requirement may see the World Languages Coordinator in McKay Faculty Building 213.

 
Certificate Programs (15 hours)
 

New Media Journalism Certificate

Vision and Rationale: Journalism has played an important role in modern society. Recent advancements in communication technologies are shaping the nature and the future directions of the field (e.g. the rise of online journalism and the convergence of various media). However, Journalism as a profession remains a growing area with strong social visibility and impact. Skills and knowledge in new media journalism help students to not only obtain meaningful jobs but also to assume influential positions in their communities/countries because of the significant role journalists play in many parts of the world.

Students are expected to integrate their majors/expertise with this certificate to increase their competitive edge in the job market. For example, this certificate enables a science student's career options beyond his or her major to also include a career in journalism as a science reporter. A similar situation applies across all disciplines.

Learning Outcomes & Essential Skills:

  1. Media writing skills for print, online and broadcast journalism
  2. Web skills to create and maintain news sites
  3. Digital media production
  4. Specialized journalism writing and reporting
  5. Broadcast production
  6. Critical analysis of news reporting
  7. Understanding of and ability to utilize professional ethics and media laws

List of Requirements (15 hours)

Core: Take all of the following (9 hours)

  • COMM 211 Media Writing (3)
  • COMM 313 Advanced Media Writing (3)
  • COMM 430 Media Laws and Ethics (3)

Choose one (3 hours)

  • COMM 323 Multimedia Production (3)
  • COMM 325 Broadcast Reporting & Production (3)

Choose one (3 hours)

  • ART 212 Beginning Photography (3)
  • ART/HUM 308 Basic Video Production (3)

 

Digital Humanities Certificate

 
Rationale & Career Options:
 

Digital humanities certificate provides an interdisciplinary training, utilizing digital technologies to increase the access of humanist study and information and facilitate research, education, public programs, and preservation as outlined by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). It integrates digital media with traditional humanistic disciplines (such as literature, music, art, history, culture) as content materials to foster innovative practices and methodologies of dissemination. Career options include positions in libraries, museums, archives, arts council, research institutions, education sector and production company.

Learning Outcomes & Essential Skills:

  1. Acquire fundamental knowledge and skills of web design.
  2. Obtain basic to intermediate level of skills in digital media's components: video, graphics and music.
  3. Apply digital technologies to enhance the access of humanities content materials.
  4. Produce a live project that supports the instruction and/or research of an academic discipline on campus, which may include digitized collections of music, texts, videos, artwork or a combination of them.

List of Requirements: (14-15 hours)

Core: Take both of the following (6 hours):
  • IT 240 Fundamentals of Web Design (3)
  • HUM 490R World Humanities Portfolio (2)

Visual Medium Elective (3 hours)

Choose one:

  • HUM 290 Introduction to Film (3)
  • ART 212 Beginning Photography (3)
  • ART/HUM 308 Basic Video Production (3)

Multimedia Production Elective (3 hours)

Choose one:

  • COMM 323 Multimedia Production (3)
  • IMD 302 Instructional Multimedia Development (3)

Additional Genre/Medium Elective (2-3 hours)

Choose one:

  • MUSC 430 Computer Music Technology (3)
  • IMD 307 Instructional Computer Graphics (3)

 

Applied Anthropology Certificate

Rationale & Career Options: Today, there is an increased demand for students with skills in Applied Anthropology. This demand will increase as globalization (intensified cultural interconnections) continues to reach all corners of the globe. Students who are trained in Applied Anthropology are currently employed by international organizations (i.e., U.N.), government agencies, corporations, historical/cultural associations, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). An Applied Anthropology certificate program will significantly improve the marketability of BYU-Hawaii students in both Asia and Oceania. In our globalized world, individuals with intercultural insight and applied anthropological skills will make valuable contributions in educational and economic development, global health, international relations, human rights, and cultural conservation. 

Learning Outcomes & Essential Skills:

  1. Recognize the interrelationship of deep cultural understanding to applied and developmental applications.
  2. Develop understanding of the varied applications of anthropology to government, non-government, and private sector organizations and institutions.
  3. Develop understanding of the complexity of culture in all human activities, and how to use such understanding to more effectively analyze, administrate, and implement applied and development programs.
  4. Develop ethnographic skills and strategies for applied anthropological work in a range of projects including education, health, legal work, agriculture and land-use planning, economic sustainability, human rights, cultural conservation and international relations.
  5. Recognize and manage conflicts among stakeholders (cultural, government, non-government, personal) in applied projects.
  6. Learn the concepts, practices, and professional ethics of applied anthropology.

List of Requirements (15 hours):

Core: Take all of the following (9 hours)

  • ANTH 105 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
  • ANTH 322 Ethnographic Skills (3)
  • ANTH 447 Applied and Development Anthropology (3)

Electives (6 hours)

Choose two:

  • HIST/HIST 492 Hawaiian Public History (3)
  • PAIS 390R Special Topics in Pacific Islands Studies (3)
  • PMGT 499 Public Management (3)
  • POSC 330 Introduction to Public Administration (3)
  • ECON 200 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
  • ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
  • ECON 350 Economic Development (3)

 

Intermediate American Sign Language and Deaf Culture Certificate

List of Requirements (15 hours):

  • ASL 101 Elementary American Sign Language Conversation I (4)
  • ASL 102 Elementary American Sign Language  Conversation II (4)
  • ASL 201 Intermediate American Sign Language Conversation I (3)
  • ASL 202 Intermediate American Sign Language Conversation II (3)

 

Strategic Communication Certificate

List of Requirements (15 hours):

Strategic Communication Core (9 credits)

Students must take the following three (3) courses:

  • COMM 201: Introduction to Strategic Communications (3)
  • COMM 311: Strategic Communication Case Studies (3)
  • COMM 321: Strategic Communication Campaigns (3)

ELECTIVES (6 credits)
Students take two of the following:

  • COMM 301: Internet and Society (3)
  • COMM 313: Cross-platform Message Design (3)
  • COMM 326: Issues in Global Communication (3)
  • COMM 420: Media and Culture (3)
  • COMM 430: Media Law and Ethics (3)
  • ICS 399R: Internship (3)
  • BUSM 304: Principles of Marketing Management (3)