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Chemistry (CHEM)


100. The World of Chemistry (3) (Variable) A course designed to give non-science students an appreciation of our chemical world. Very basic concepts are presented which are then related to the chemistry all around us. The topics vary with instructor.

101. Introduction to General Chemistry (3) (F) An introduction to the principles of general chemistry. This optional course is designed as preparation for CHEM 105/106 for science majors with little or no chemistry background. Topics include: measurements and dimensional analysis, atomic theory, atomic structure, basics of molecular structure, stoichiometry, intermolecular forces, gas laws, and solution chemistry; these topics may vary by instructor.

105. General Chemistry I (3) (F, W) The principles of chemistry for science majors. Topics include: measurements and units, stoichiometry, aqueous chemistry, oxidation-reductions reactions, energy, atomic structure, principles of chemical bonding and molecular structure, and behavior of gases. (Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 110 with grade of C- or better, or ACT Math score higher than 22, or SAT Math score higher than 520. High school chemistry or CHEM 101 highly recommended.)

105L. General Chemistry I Laboratory & Recitation (1) (F, W) Alternating three-hour lab and one-hour recitation throughout the semester. Experiments are designed to complement topics covered in CHEM 105. Proper scientific writing is emphasized.(Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 110 with grade of C- or better, or ACT Math score higher than 22, or SAT Math score higher than 520. Concurrent registration with CHEM 105 is required.)

106. General Chemistry II (3) (W, S) A continuation of the principles of chemistry for science majors. Topics include: intermolecular forces, properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acid/base chemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and transition metal chemistry. (Prerequisite: CHEM 105 and 105L. Concurrent registration with CHEM 106L is required.)

106L. General Chemistry II Laboratory & Recitation (1) (W, S) Alternating three-hour lab and one-hour recitation throughout the semester. This course should be taken concurrently with CHEM 106. Experiments are designed to complement topics covered in CHEM 106. Proper scientific writing is emphasized. (Prerequisite: CHEM 105 and 105L. Concurrent registration with CHEM 106 is required.)

201. Chemical & Laboratory Safety (1) (F, W, S) Lectures and demonstrations are designed to prepare students to work safely in the chemistry lab. Topics covered include regularity and compliance protocols, chemical hazards, protection, prevention, emergencies, and other aspects essential for laboratory safety. This course can be taken concurrently with CHEM 351/L and/or CHEM 326/L. (Prerequisite: CHEM 105 and 105L)

326. Analytical Biochemistry (2) (F) Principles of chemical and modern chemical analysis. This course is an involved hands-on laboratory/lecture mixture that allows the student to become familiar with multiple methods to quantitatively characterize chemical systems. In the process students are trained to use state of the art instrumentation including HPLC, LCMS, AAS, fluorometer, and more. This class must be taken in conjunction with CHEM 326L. (Prerequisites: CHEM 106/L; CHEM 201 co- or pre-requisite)

326L. Analytical Biochemistry Lab I (2) (F) Principles of chemical and modern chemical analysis. This course is an involved hands-on laboratory/lecture mixture that allows the student to become familiar with multiple methods to quantitatively characterize chemical systems. In the process students are trained to use state of the art instrumentation including HPLC, LCMS, AAS, fluorometer, and more. This lab must be taken in conjunction with CHEM 326.(Prerequisites: CHEM 106/L; CHEM 201 co- or pre-requisite)

351. Organic Chemistry I (3) (F) Study of the structure, stereochemistry, reactions, reaction mechanisms, preparations, and properties of the principle classes of carbon compounds. (Prerequisite: CHEM 106/L; CHEM 201 co- or pre-requisite.  Co-requisite: CHEM 351L)

351L. Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (1) (F) Laboratory techniques used for isolation, purification, synthesis, and identification of organic compounds including such instrumentation as IR, NMR, UV-VIS, and mass spectroscopy. Three-hour laboratory. (Prerequisite: CHEM 106/L; CHEM 201 co- or pre-requisite Co-requisite: CHEM 351)

352. Organic Chemistry II (3) (W) A continuation of the study of the properties and reactions of the principle classes of carbon compounds. (Prerequisites: CHEM 351 and 351L. Co-requisite: CHEM 352L)

352L. Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (1) (W) Synthesis, analysis and identification of organic compounds using the techniques from CHEM 251L. Concurrent registration in 252 required. Three-hour laboratory. (Prerequisites: CHEM 351 and 351L. Co-requisite: CHEM 352)

370. Inorganic Chemistry (3) (Variable) The properties and behavior of inorganic compounds. Topics include atomic structure, bonding theory, acid-base concepts, organometallic chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, environmental chemistry, and coordination chemistry including the major theories of ligand bonding and electronic structure. (Prerequisite: CHEM 106/L).

381. Biochemistry I (3) (F, S)The structural and functional properties of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. The structural specificity and kinetics of enzymes, as well as the organization of cellular membranes, biosignaling, and networking are also major parts of this course.(Prerequisites: CHEM 352 and 352L and BIOL 112 and BIOL 112L. (Completion of BIOL 376/L or BIOL 441/L is strongly recommended.))

381L. Biochemistry Laboratory I (1) (F, S) Physical methods in biochemistry, including spectrophotometry, centrifugation, electrophoresis, and various chromatographic techniques. Enzyme kinetics plus methods of isolation, purification and analysis of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and other biological molecules. This course should be taken concurrently with CHEM 381. (Prerequisites: CHEM 352 and 352L and BIOL 112 and BIOL 112L. (Completion of BIOL 376/L or BIOL 441/L is strongly recommended.))

382. Biochemistry II (3) (W) The second half of the Biochemistry sequence, exploring the fundamentals of metabolism: the synthesis and degradation of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, and their regulation. This course also includes the biochemistry of DNA replication, transcription and translation (Prerequisites: CHEM 381 and 381L.)

382L. Biochemistry Laboratory II (1) (W) Continuation of the methods in CHEM 381L. Specifically, this course focuses on learning the cell based (primarily mammalian cell culture) approaches used in biochemistry, such as: drug testing, transfection, immunoprecipitation, protein expression analyses via microscopy, electrophoresis, and western immunoblotting. This course should be taken concurrently with CHEM 382. (Prerequisites: CHEM 381 and 381L.) Fee required.

390R. Special Topics in Chemistry (1-4) (Variable).

395. Organic Spectroscopy (3) (S-odd years) Structure determination of organic and bio-organic chemicals using infrared (IR), proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS), and mass spectroscopies (MS). (Prerequisites: CHEM 352 and 352L.)

399R. Internship in Chemistry (1-12) (Variable) Credit for applied experience in chemistry (Prerequisite: Department consent.)

450. Advanced Organic Synthesis (3) (S-even years) A concentration on advanced topics in organic chemistry including enantioselective catalysis, organometallic chemistry, name reactions and a study of more advanced, arrow-pushing, reaction mechanisms for the synthesis of complex molecules. (Prerequisite: CHEM 352 and 352L).

468. Physical Biochemistry (3) (S) Application of physical chemistry to biological systems. Topics include: thermodynamics, kinetics, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, and biophysical experimental techniques. Completion of calculus and PHYS 121 recommended. (Prerequisites: CHEM 381 and 381L and PHYS 121. Completion of PHYS 221 is recommended.)

491.Undergraduate Research (1) (F) The beginning of a 4-course sequence in which the student learns the process of conducting and reporting biochemical research. In this course students learn how to use the chemical literature and to write scientifically. (Completion or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 352 and 352L. Completion of CHEM 381 recommended.)

492-493-494. Undergraduate Research (1-1-1) (W-W-S) These three lab courses should be taken concurrently with each other. This is a continuation from CHEM 491: students participate in a group biochemical research project. In addition, each student develops and presents a scientific poster based on obtained results. Finally, each student writes a senior thesis and prepares and presents a final seminar open to the entire university. (Prerequisites: CHEM 491)

495R. Independent Study (Varies) (F, W, S) This is a course taken primarily by students who are research assistants in chemistry, although this course would apply to students doing other supervised individual study. (Prerequisite: Department consent.)

496R. Student Research (1-3) (F, W, S) Course taken by a student who is granted a student research and development associateship. Required of all research associates. (Prerequisite: Department consent.)