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Culture and History


Faculty


Department Chair

Advisors

     Academic Advising Office (808) 675-4706

Professor

  • McArthur, Phillip H., Anthropology(1995) B.A. 1987, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1989, Indiana University; Ph.D. 1995, Indiana University.
  • Tueller, James B., History (1997) B.A. 1989, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1991, Columbia University; M.Phil. 1993, Columbia University; Ph.D. 1997, Columbia University.

Associate Professors

  • Fermantez, Kali, Hawaiian Studies (2009) B.A. 1997, Brigham Young University—Hawaii; M.A. 1999, Brigham Young University; Ph.D. 2007, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
  • Ford, Chad, Intercultural Peacebuilding (2005) B.A. 1995, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; M.S. 2000, George Mason University; J.D. 2000, Georgetown University.  
  • Ka'ili, Tevita, Anthropology (2005) B.S. 1993, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; B.S. 1996, University of Utah; M.S.W. 1998, University of Washington; M.A. 2003, University of Washington; Ph.D. 2008, University of Washington.
  • McBride, Richard D., History(2008) B.A. 1993, Brigham Young University; Ph.D. 2001, University of California Los Angeles.
  • Murdock, Michael G., History (2007) B.A. 1988, Brigham Young University; M.A. 1990 Brigham Young University; M.A. 1994, University of Michigan Ann Arbor; Ph.D. 1999 University of Michigan Ann Arbor.
  • Walker, Isaiah M., History (2006) B.A. 1997, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; M.A. 2000, University of Hawaii at Manoa; Ph.D. 2006, University of California, Santa Barbara.
  • Wesley, Hiagi M., Pacific Island Studies (2006) M.Ed. in Educational Administration 1977, Brigham Young University; Ed.D. 1987, Brigham Young University.

Assistant Professors

  • Housman, April Alohalani, Hawaiian Studies (2016) B.S. 1982, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; B.S. 2000, University of Hawaii at Hilo; M.Ed. 2003, University of Hawaii at Hilo.
  • Walk, Richard K. Kamoa'elehua, Hawaiian Studies (1996) B.S. 1987, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; M.A. 2001, University of Hawaii-Manoa.

 Affiliated Faculty Members:

  • Christiansen, AnnaMarie, English (2003) B.A. 1992, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; M.A. 1996, University of Hawaii; D.A. 2003, Idaho State University.
  • Ram, Rosalind Meno (1994) B.A. 1989, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; M.L.S. 1993, University of Hawaii at Manoa.; Ed.D. 2017, University of Southern California.

Special Instructors

  • Baclayon, Keoki; Hawaiian Cultures & Languages, B.A. 2009, University of Hawaii at Manoa; M.A. 2012, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
  • Eldridge, Kaluhialoha; Hawaiian Cultures & Languages, B.A. 2004, University of Hawaii at Manoa; M.A. 2014, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
  • Falevai, Zoia; Pacific Island Studies, B.A. 2004, Brigham Young University-Hawaii; M.L.I.Sc 2013, University of Hawaii-Manoa.
  • Fitzgerald, Seamus; Maori Language, B.A. 1999, Brigham Young University-Hawaii; M.P. 2002, Massey University-New Zealand.
  • Galea'i, Shannon; Pacific Island Studies, B.A. 2001, Brigham Young University-Hawaii.
  • Ika, Freddie; Pacific Island Studies, B.S.W. 2011, Brigham Young University-Hawaii; M.S.W. 2012, Hawaii Pacific University.
  • Manoa, Roy Kaipo; Hawaiian Cultures & Languages, P.C.C. Hawaiian Village Cultural Expert & Presenter.
  • Mapu, Maryann;Samoan Language, B.S. 1997, Brigham Young University-Hawaii; M.A. 1999, University of Phoenix.
  • Miller, Kela; Hawaiian Cultures & Languages 
  • Pane'e, Terry; Hawaiian Cultures & Languages, B.S. 1987, Brigham Young University-Hawaii.
  • Pasi, Amelia; Tongan Language, B.A. 1975, Brigham Young University-Hawaii; M.A. 2005, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
  • Pere, Jared; Pacific Island Studies, AutoCAD Training 1991, Kapiolani Community College; AutoCAD Training 1992, Honolulu Community College.
  • Reid, Rowena; Samoan Language, B.S. 1976, Brigham Young University-Hawaii; M.S. 1981, Oregon State University; EdD. 2016, University of Southern California.
  • Walker, Rebekah; Cultural Anthropology, (2006) B.A. 1999, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; M.A. 2015, University of California Santa Barbara.

Emeritus Faculty

  • Baldridge, Kenneth (1968-1993)
  • Gubler, Greg (1982-2005)
  • Stanton, Max (1971-2006)

Programs Descriptions


Cultural Anthropology Major

Anthropology represents a comparative and holistic study of the human condition past and present. The historical (mythological, physical, and archaeological) and ethnographic (socio-cultural and linguistic) methods offer a unique cross-cultural perspective on humankind anciently and today. Our goal is to sharpen critical and analytical thinking about cultural differences and similarities through careful and in-depth studies of particular cultures, and then through a comparative approach, explore underlying cultural processes in the past as well as those within current regional and global trends. We also hope to explore culturally sensitive applications of Anthropological understanding to indignity, social inequalities, development and transcultural relations. By studying these processes in a variety of cultural and historical contexts, we will gain not only an appreciation of "others," but discover an "otherness" in ourselves.

This Interdisciplinary Cultural Anthropology Major will provide students with a range of knowledge concerning cultural studies and sociocultural systems. Students will start with the basics focusing on contemporary applications of Cultural Anthropology and then proceed to encounter topics ranging from Hawaiian Cultures to Oceanic Societies to Current Issues in Anthropology and to Applied Anthropology. While gaining this knowledge, students will also obtain a thorough review of historical, social, and cultural theories that have informed anthropological inquiry and practice.

Hawaiian Studies Major

The mission of the Hawaiian Language and Cultural Studies program is to provide all of our students who choose to attend BYU–Hawaii the opportunity to study the Hawaiian language, the Hawaiian culture, the history, and all the positive aspects of the Hawaiian people within the context of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and to foster the principles of service, leadership, hospitality, respect, perseverance, humility, and aloha that we believe is nothing less than the pure love of our Savior, Jesus Christ. Within these parameters the program for Hawaiian Language and Cultural Studies teaches the following curriculum. Two tracks of study are available: a Hawaiian language track and a Hawaiian culture track. It is recommended that students majoring in Hawaiian studies minor in another area. No grade lower than a C- will be counted towards the major.

History Major

The History major lies at the center of the liberal arts curriculum and supports the University goal of obtaining a broad university education based on the world's arts, letters, and sciences. It offers students the opportunity to expand their horizons around the globe and across time from the earliest human era to the present. History students work in positions of challenge and responsibility in nearly every field, from business to teaching to law to government service. Many go on to earn graduate and professional degrees. They learn skills in research, writing, critical thinking, synthesis and interdisciplinarity that offer the best preparation for the varying challenges of work and service in the rapidly changing world.

Finally, it takes as a central goal the development of a student's ability to think clearly, communicate effectively, learn independently and solve problems successfully.

 

Intercultural Peacebuilding Major

The Intercultural Peacebuilding seeks to refine and mold the divine potential of BYU-Hawaii graduates to influence peace for the good at home, in the workplace, in communities and throughout the world. It not only emphasizes theories of harmony, cross cultural leadership, and conflict transformation but also highlights the spiritual components of these areas such as forgiveness and reconciliation by drawing on a broad range of theories and techniques from the academic disciplines of anthropology, cultural studies, political science, psychology, history, economics, law and business.

A major in intercultural peacebuilding will provide opportunities for employment in careers in the public, private and non-for-profit sectors as an understanding of the theories of conflict and sustainable community building and development. Students will also gain knowledge and basic skills necessary to navigate the intricacies of intercultural communication and negotiation in whatever their chosen profession may be.

One of the primary goals of IPB is the fulfillment of BYU-Hawaii's prophetic mission to accept, adapt, and integrate cultural differences through the transcendent principles of love, faith, and peace combined with a rigorous academic curriculum that directly addresses cross-cultural understanding. As a microcosm of global diversity, BYU-Hawaii provides an exceptional environment for Intercultural Peacebuilding.

Pacific Island Studies Major

Pacific Islands Studies is an interdisciplinary major. It focuses on current issues of the lands and peoples of the Pacific Islands region. It offers students the opportunity to learn skills in critical thinking, oral presentation and research writing while understanding the Pacific Islands in both a regional and global setting. Students of Pacific Islands Studies are able to continue graduate study or enter the work force in a variety of areas, where an intimate knowledge of Pacific issues can be an advantage. This is especially enhanced when the student takes a minor in another discipline.

Career Opportunities


The major will provide a rigorous pre-professional degree to prepare students for graduate school in law, business and public administration, diplomacy, public relations, development, as well as academic programs. As a terminal degree the program will prepare highly desirable and competent professional consultants, business and government administration, teachers, writers in fields and professions where cultural interaction and differences are significant.
 
A student of history acquires skills and attitudes that are valuable assets in the professional world. With excellent writing, analytical and research skills, history majors are desirable in fields of education, government, publishing, information, advocacy and business. A wealth of opportunities awaits the history graduate, including careers as teachers, writers, lawyers, archivists, politicians and entrepreneurs. A student of history has every opportunity that thinking about the past and the present in a multitude of ways can open up to them. The values of curiosity and inquisitiveness make history majors people who desire to learn more and live life as a continual education

Programs Outcomes


 
Upon completing a major in Cultural Anthropology, students will:
  • Demonstrate working competency in cultural literacy and cultural diversity.
  • Appreciate cultural differences and develop problem solving skills.
  • Think critically.
  • Cultivate curiosity for life-long learning and leadership.
  • Understand the application of anthropological knowledge, theories and methods to the solutions of societal problems.
  • Articulate and sustain views through verbal and written discourse.
  • Be well prepared to enter graduate school or employment.

 

Upon completing a major in Hawaiian Studies, students will:

  • Demonstrate greater awareness, understanding, and appreciation of Hawaiʻi and the Pacific Islands in relationship to the wider and sometimes more complicated global community.
  • Learn skills in research, writing, critical thinking, listening and retention to assist in problem solving.
  • Work towards full competency in speaking, reading, writing, and doing research in the Hawaiian Language plus service to the community.
  • Enter graduate school or find employment within one year of graduation.
  • Complete a successful, integrative internship and under supervision, function within the structure of organizations and service delivery systems, and seek necessary organizational change (for students completing a major in Pacific Island Studies).

 

Upon completing a major in History, students will:

  1. Develop information literacy skills for evaluating historical and library sources.
  2. Communicate effectively about the past through written and oral presentations.
  3. Analyze arguments and perspectives of others.
  4. Develop historical ways of thinking to critically assess the past.
  5. Learn context from at least three of four major geographical areas (Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania).
  6. Connect to related disciplines, such as political science, geography, etc.
  7. Value the past and present of world communities.

 

Upon completing a major in Intercultural Peacebuilding, students will:

  • Effectively understand cultural differences and conflicts.
  • Think critically and empathetically.
  • Employ skills such as mediation, facilitation and research to develop solutions to real world problems.
  • Articulate and sustain views through verbal and written discourse.
  • Be well prepared to enter graduate school or employment.

 

Upon completing a major in Pacific Islands Studies, students will:

  • Demonstrate greater awareness, understanding, and appreciation of Hawaiʻi and the Pacific Islands in relationship to the wider and sometimes more complicated global community.
  • Learn skills in research, writing, critical thinking, listening and retention to assist in problem solving.
  • Work towards full competency in speaking, reading, writing, and doing research in the Hawaiian Language plus service to the community.
  • Enter graduate school or find employment within one year of graduation.
  • Complete a successful, integrative internship and under supervision, function within the structure of organizations and service delivery systems, and seek necessary organizational change (for students completing a major in Pacific Island Studies).
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